FederalJobs.net

Federal Government Jobs

Helping job hunters find, apply for, and land government jobs

Transportation Security Officer – Positions Now Available

The Department of Homeland Security’s Transportation Security Agency employs more than 50,000 transportation security officers (TSOs) at 440 airports nationwide. TSOs provide security and protect travelers across all transportation sectors. Their duties extend to securing high-profile events, important figures and/or anything that includes or impacts this nation’s transportation systems.

Currently, over 442 job vacancy announcements are posted online, many for multiple positions at airports across the county. The starting salary is $35,152 ($16.90 / hour). Salary is adjusted per locality pay area. Many locations are offering sign on bonuses of $1,000 or more and starting salary can be negotiated under certain conditions.  

Applicants must have a high school diploma, General Educational Development (GED), High School Equivalency Test (HiSET), or Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC) credential OR at least one year of full-time work experience in the security industry, aviation screening, or as an X-ray technician.  English language proficiency is also required.

TSO Duties

Transportation Security Officers (TSOs) provide security and protection of air travelers, airports and perform the following duties:

  • Operating various screening equipment and technology to identify dangerous objects in baggage, cargo and on passengers, and preventing those objects from being transported onto aircraft.
  • Performing searches and screening, which may include physical interaction with passengers (e.g., pat-downs, search of property, etc.), conducting bag searches and lifting/carrying bags, bins, and property weighing up to 50lbs.
  • Controlling terminal entry and exit points.
  • Interacting with the public, giving directions and responding to inquiries.
  • Maintaining focus and awareness while working in a stressful environment which includes noise from alarms, machinery and people, crowd distractions, time pressure, and disruptive and angry passengers, in order to preserve the professional ability to identify and locate potentially life threatening or mass destruction devices, and to make effective decisions in both crisis and routine situations.
  • Engaging in continuous development of critical thinking skills, necessary to mitigate actual and potential security threats, by identifying, evaluating, and applying appropriate situational options and approaches.  This may include application of risk-based security screening protocols that vary based on program requirements.
  • Retaining and implementing knowledge of all applicable Standard Operating Procedures, demonstrating responsible and dependable behavior, and is open to change and adapts to new information or unexpected obstacles. write necessary correspondence and narrative reports of contacts.

The following link will take you to the GS 1802 Occupational Description that includes links to the current job announcements on USAJOBS.

TSOs are encountered at transportations hubs nationwide. Explore the opportunities and visit www.federaljobs.net regularly for new recruiting initiatives.

Compliance Inspection and Support Careers

Federal high paying job opportunities are available for those who know how to apply and tap this lucrative job market. Jobs are available at thousands of locations stateside and overseas with excellent career advancement opportunities?

Compliance Inspection and Support Careers GS-1802 Series

This article features positions that perform or supervise inspection or technical support work in assuring compliance with or enforcement of Federal law, regulations, or other mandatory guidelines. We help those seeking federal employment explore occupations and navigate the application process. Plus, we link you to current job vacancies and provide resume/application guidance, including sample federal style resumes.

Compliance Inspection and Support Careers (GS-1802)

Positions included in this series are intended to perform inspection or technical support work in assuring compliance with or enforcement of Federal law. The work falls primarily in inspections where determinations are based on visual or other specific inspection techniques and are made based on relatively clear-cut considerations such as the presence or absence of required documents or the obvious physical condition of an item or premises. The second area involves support to inspections or investigations such as searching for, gathering, screening, and providing factual information or explanations related to the subject of an inspection or investigation or to the compliance program itself.

There are currently over 474 vacancy announcements, many with multiple positions, advertised nationwide in this occupational group. The federal government employs 55,129 in this occupation. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) the largest employer with 52,278, most are Transportation Security Officers located at every major airport in the country and US Territories. The Department of Transportation employs 181, and there are small numbers employed in this group at other large cabinet level agencies.

Typical Job Titles:

  • Transportation Security Officer (TSO)
  • Aviation Safety Technician
  • Employee Benefit Plan Assistant
  • Law Enforcement Communications Assistant
  • Forensic Laboratory Technician Evidence
  • Mine Safety and Health Assistant
  • Safety and Health Clerk
  • Wage Hour Technician

A number of these job announcements list multiple vacancies at various locations. For example, one of the announcements from (DHS) advertises positions at three locations. When you add up the multiple vacancies, you will discover many additional opportunities in this field for you to explore and at locations across the country.

If you are looking for a challenging position in this field explore these opportunities. The following link will take you to the GS 1802 Occupational Description that includes links to the current job announcements on USAJOBS.

Visit our jobs board to search for all other occupations by job title.

To find vacancies in your area, locate job announcements of interest and review the required qualifications. If you have the experience, education and/or work experience specified, apply online.

Each month we will feature a different occupation. Visit our website regularly to find information about federal jobs in your area.

Helpul Job Hunting Information:

Disclaimer: The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Homeland Security Hiring – Sign Up For Their Webinars

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is hiring hundreds of criminal investigators, deportation officers, Customs and Border Protection officers, Border Patrol agents, special agents, physical security specialists, police officers, emergency management specialists, intelligence analysts, and more. If you know someone who is interested in a rewarding career in law enforcement let them know about these opportunities and have them participate in one of their upcoming webinar recruiting sessions. The webinars will provide information on DHS career opportunities; the law enforcement hiring process and timelines; special hiring authorities; effective resume writing; and how to create a profile on USAJOBS. These two-hour webinars will be offered twelve times over the next two months and they are open to the public. They start April 23 running through June 20, 2018. Register to attend one of the webinars.

For all other law enforcement jobs review the occupational summary and qualifications and then search the current vacancy listings for positions in your area. We link direct to USAJob listings from our occupational profiles. The federal government employs thousands of law enforcement personnel in more than 40 job series.  Review the occupational profiles and the number employed at each agency for the top 24 jobs to see where you might fit in.

Helpful Career Planning Tools

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

 

 

The Importance of Building a Cyber Workforce

In order to meet the cyber challenges of today, we must build upon the knowledge, skills and abilities of tomorrow. In order to protect networks and our critical infrastructure, we must be armed with the right resources, people and tools. To do this, many organizations across the globe are developing partnerships with universities, academic groups, private industry, government and more to foster this holistic approach to cybersecurity.

One example is the Centers of Academic Excellence (CAE) in Cybersecurity Program has been implemented in partnership with the National Security Agency (NSA) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The goal for this endeavor is to “reduce vulnerability in our national information infrastructure by promoting higher education and research in cyber defense and producing professionals with cyber defense expertise for the nation.” In addition, the CAE program supports the President’s National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE). NICE surrounds the notion of building a digital nation with the goal of “broadening the pool of skilled workers capable of supporting a cyber-secure nation” (nsa.gov).

Cybersecurity, an integral function of the intelligence community,  has become and will remain a top priority of our nation, particularly with the advancement of technology and subsequent sophistication of attacks. There is an increasing demand for a skilled workforce that is qualified to meet our security needs going forward. Organizations across the globe, big and small, are focusing on the creation of additional jobs in the cyber arena, thereby increasing hiring for cybersecurity professionals; protection of information systems and critical networks are a top priority for everyone. Staffing these jobs can mean the difference between success and failure for these organizations. Partnerships with the organizations mentioned above, and specifically the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), foster a strong workforce positioned for success. DHS is able to provide tools, resources and the education required for a sustainable, cyber focused workforce. Personnel can then be trained to meet demands, fill gaps, and more effectively match to defined roles and responsibilities. In addition to talent, retention is also a critical component for organizational success. DHS and many other agencies are actively working with their personnel on retention and bonus programs to ensure a stellar workforce.

DHS offers a cybersecurity workforce tool as a resource for other organizations striving to achieve world class protection. First, identifying and quantifying your current personnel, will promote strategic planning and development in critical areas; gaps will be closed. Understanding the needs of the organization, both present and future, along with the needs of your personnel will ensure the professional development programs are provided while organizational goals are achieved. A robust hiring program will complement existing pool of qualified personnel and an even more robust education and training awareness program will lend itself to continued security protection. Finally, developing key talents….establishing skill enhancement and training opportunities will attract and retain qualified personnel (USCERT.gov)

Meeting the needs for future cyber challenges won’t be easy. However, with proper focus, planning and preparation, we can posture ourselves for a chance at a better. With the myriad of partnerships, information sharing and collaboration opportunities organizations have at their fingertips, as well as the knowledge, skills and expertise of others, they can work together, easily to reduce risk, and protect networks and critical infrastructure.

References:

Career Planning Tools 

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Is a Move to the Private Sector in Your Future?

Thinking about leaving the Federal Sector? You are not alone, with the Internet explosion and specifically the cybersecurity challenges we are facing today, many of our colleagues are leaving their federal jobs to join private companies across the globe and embarking on new careers. However, a major move like this should not be taken lightly…there are many things to consider including: is it worth it, how do I go about it…. what about job security? These questions along with a host of others will be explored as we discuss the ins and outs of a potential transition to a private sector career.

Vesting – In order to be eligible to receive at least a partial FERS retirement benefit there is a five year creditable civilian service requirement. If you have 5 years or more of federal service when you leave you will be able to collect a deferred annuity at age 62 for life. You will also have the option of either retaining your Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) account or move it to your new employer’s plan; this is a critical component since you may wish to ensure your TSP is retained if you plan on eventually returning to federal service. The FERS benefit booklet provides a wealth of details and information on vesting, contributions, benefits and more.

For example, if you worked 20 years in federal service and had an average high three year earnings of $100,000 a year your benefit at age $62 would be $20,000 a year for the remainder of your life. Your annuity would be adjusted annually for cost of living increases.  This defined benefit is worth retaining and it complements your Social Security, TSP, and other retirement savings that you would have from your new employer. Many choose to cash-in their FERS accounts when they leave and years later regret they gave up a fixed annuity for life. Secondly, if they cash it out and end up back in federal service they have to repay the amount withdrawn in order to have the years you worked previously in government added back to fund your FERS retirement.

It should also be noted that in your new private sector job survivor and disability benefits would not be available until the required 18 months of civilian service has been achieved.

Reinstatement Rights  – If you have at least three years of federal service you have certain reinstatement rights and it is easier to return to federal service. Reinstatement allows former federal employees to reenter the Federal competitive service workforce without competing with the general public. Former federal employees may apply for any open civil service examination, but reinstatement eligibility also enables you to apply for Federal jobs open only to status candidates, those already working in government.

Salary Statistics – review potential salaries from the Occupational Outlook Handbook for the following groups:

Some major reasons for making the change from government to private sector include: better compensation, a change in work roles, flexibility and/or work and life balance, or a major life event. Many employees are in demand, and particularly those with law enforcement, intelligence, leadership and cybersecurity expertise. Given this, those wishing to make this change must rewrite their background and experience to fit the private sector; becoming more of an entrepreneurial spirit while meeting the needs of a global corporation are usually expected. With a faster pace, focus on productivity and profit, additional responsibilities and greater accountability, government employees must understand all of the changes surrounding a potential private sector position.

On the positive side, you will find a solid work ethic in the private sector as employees work to get the job done, and in fact, the rewards can be significantly more than what you experienced in the federal sector.

On the challenging side, you can expect longer working hours, and adoption of new skills and new challenges. You will certainly want to do your homework, research companies of interest, weigh the pros and cons, and take into consideration personality, cultural and logistical changes as well.

Early career planning, solid mentors and relationship building are critical components when making a shift. Career counseling is a must to navigate this type of change; reach out to others within your personal and professional network for advice, guidance and support. In many cases, moving to the private sector can not only satisfy financial goals and objectives, but can also offer great flexibility (closer to home and/or part time hours). By doing your homework, determining whether to work for a small or larger company, a service or product based firm, or type of role, planning is key. In addition, talking with government colleagues who already moved to the private sector can prove extremely helpful; listen to their challenges, pitfalls and positive outcomes in order to take everything into consideration for a comprehensive decision.

Be sure to address your financial situation; can you afford to take a risk at this time in your life should the new job not go as expected; is there an opportunity to return to your former agency through the use of reinstatement rights as mentioned previously in the article?

Transitioning to the private sector can be scary, but extremely rewarding with the right planning. By staying connected, taking your time, and doing your own research, you can land that (next) dream job, easily.

References:

References & Career Planning Tools 

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Careers For Recent College Grads

It is the season when thousands of students march to the stage to receive their AA, BA or MA degrees from colleges and universities across the country. It’s a happy time for all, especially for parents who proudly witnessed their children receive that coveted diploma that only 40% of the citizens of the USA possess. But along with that diploma, 68% of recent college grads received an invoice for a student loan averaging $37,000, an unwelcome burden not only for the graduates but also for their parents. So now that our recent college grads have a diploma and a student loan to repay, what’s next?

 

What’s Next!

The good news is that this is the best time in the past ten years for college grads entering the job market. Our economy is virtually at full employment and employers are looking high and low for additional workers to maintain and grow their businesses. A recent survey by Career Builder reveals that 74 percent of employers contacted stated that they plan to hire recent college grads. And, a recent Forbes survey indicated that the starting salary range for recent college grads is $45,000-$53,000. Good times are here again….for those college grads who know what kind of work they want to do and how to find job opportunities that will provide a paycheck to enable them to become self-sufficient.

Some of our recent college grads have decided on a career path that will take them to graduate school or to a specific job niche in the private or public sector. However, most others do not have a clue about what happens after the applause, handshakes, and the trip back home to live with Mom and Dad. The conventional, but erroneous, wisdom says that the way to a job after graduation is to sit down and write a “killer” resume and send it to multiple jobs boards. Then, like magic, a job will appear that pays well and provides satisfaction for the rest of your working years. That is just not the way it works.

To make that job appear sooner rather than later, the recent college grad must look at job hunting as a process that includes: learning ones aptitude and abilities; targeting a specific job in a specific company; developing a personal relationship with the hiring manager and human resources director; preparing a creditable resume; learning the basic rules and protocols for interviewing; attending conferences and trade shows at local convention centers; learning how to network with established workers; making cold calls on companies located in office and industrial centers; learning how to negotiate a job offer; and finally establishing an office at home to make it all happen. Each step in the process is a learned skill for all workers but especially for the recent college grad entering the adult world of full time work. Sadly these skills are not taught in colleges which sends the learning process back in the lap of the recent college grads and their parents who still have the primary responsibility for educating their children, college degree notwithstanding.  All steps of the process are important but at the top of the list is leaving the house to find hiring managers in the flesh. You do that by making unscheduled calls at company offices and attending conferences and trade shows.

Learning what kinds of jobs are available is an important start in the job hunting process. According to recent surveys here are the best industry sectors for 2017 college grads.

  • Business and scientific services
  • Educational Services
  • Finance
  • Insurance
  • Healthcare
  • Government

Functionally, the job categories most in demand are:

  • Information technology
  • Customer service
  • Business development
  • Finance/accounting
  • Production

So where does a recent college grad begin to look for a job?  It’s more than just throwing darts at a board and hoping one will stick. Finding companies that offer cutting edge products and services is a good way to start. But, who are these companies?  To get you moving in the right direction, here are twenty companies recommended in The Muse Newsletter, www.themuse.com.

  1. Caesars Entertainment…casino gaming resorts in the USA and abroad
  2. World First…financial services focusing on cross country payments
  3. Polaris…. consulting and compliance services for healthcare and life sciences
  4. Taboola…helping publishers monetize their content
  5. Good Apple Digital…digital planning media services
  6. Bonobos…contemporary custom made men’s clothing
  7. CreditCards.com…partners with banks to provide credit cards for consumers
  8. Synapse…developer of transformative digital products
  9. BackCountry.com…online supplier of high quality outdoor gear worldwide
  10. Redfin…real estate brokerage services for buyers and sellers
  11. Vanguard….worldwide financial investment services
  12. Revcontent…delivers content recommendations using widget technology
  13. 540…provides cutting-edge technology solutions for government agencies
  14. Black Mountain Systems… IT workflow management for financial companies
  15. Hirevue…provides solutions to recruit, train and retain workers
  16. Bridgestone Americas…global supplier of products for manufacturing and mining
  17. Fluxx…digital grant management for philanthropy initiatives
  18. PrintFleet…provides data driven remote print management solutions
  19. Agile…information technology staffing, recruiting and personnel management
  20. Tillster…provides software to manage mobile payments to restaurants

These companies are noted for their employee friendly culture and for providing a work environment where workers will find life/work balance…..and a little fun. Their web pages provide images of their recent college grad workers and the company work environment.  Go to the Internet and research each company for job opportunities in your location.

For those not interested in private sector corporate jobs here are two viable alternatives.

  1. Joining the military…..Army, Marines, Air Force, Navy or Coast Guard. This is an option rarely considered by recent college grads because of a general misunderstanding about what happens in the military. The most common misperception is that joining the military means that you will be deployed immediately to fight in the trenches in some god forsaken place like Afghanistan. The reality is that for each active combat job, there are hundreds of jobs behind the scenes similar to jobs in the civilian world. The big plus for spending time in the military is that one learns lifelong leadership skills, discipline and focus. And, what could be a better way to begin your working life than to serve our country, to give back for all the blessings we have inherited for being born in America? In addition, serving in the military provides substantial benefits to all veterans, like tuition reimbursement to continue ones education, lifelong healthcare and a pension.
  2. Pursuing a federal government job. The federal government, the nation’s largest employer with over 2.5 million employees, offers interesting jobs that pay as much as or more than comparable jobs in the private sector. The majority of federal government jobs are not political jobs and most are located away from Washington DC. The focus of these jobs could be anything from law enforcement, environmental conservation to finance to cybersecurity… and everything in between. In addition, there is a federal government program titled, The Recent Graduates Program. Explore the many federal jobs that are available stateside and overseas.

To begin the process of finding a job straight out of college we recommend that all recent grads and their parents read the following books:

WELCOME TO THE REAL WORLD; A Complete Guide to Job Hunting for the Recent College Grad. John Henry Weiss.  Skyhorse Publishing Inc. This book is available in paperback and eBook from Amazon, B&N and the publisher.

The Book of U.S. Government Jobs. Dennis Damp. Bookhaven Press. This book is available in paperback and eBook from Amazon, B&N and the publisher

Occupational Outlook Handbook, U.S. Department of Labor. Jist Publishing Company. This book is available in paperback and eBook from Amazon, B&N and the publisher.

Moving Forward

There has never been a better time for recent college grads to look for a job because employers are seeking additional workers as our economy expands. Those who take the time to learn how the adult world of work really works and who follow the rules in this article and in the above cited books should have no trouble connecting with employers seeking intelligent, energetic and passionate recent college grads.

Copyright 2017 by John Henry Weiss Author of WELCOME TO THE REAL WORLD.

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Now Hiring 1700 Border Patrol Agents (GS-1896)

The U.S. Border Patrol is one of our nation’s largest border security agencies, protecting the American people from terrorism, human and drug smuggling, and illegal migration. More than 20,000 Border Patrol Agents protect our way of life 24/7, safeguarding nearly 6,000 miles of land border the United States shares with Canada and Mexico, and more than 2,000 miles of coastal waters.

The U.S. Government needs 1700 new Border Patrol Agents.  The new administration will be placing more emphasis on improving the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) service.

The CBP has two new job announcements that opened on January 08, 2017, both will close on February 07, 2017. Here are the links for these announcements:

Some of the hiring locations in the United States include: Arizona, South and West Texas/New Mexico.

For a unique perspective on the human side of being a Border Patrol Agent, read the article titled Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officer Jobs that includes interviews with three Border Patrol Agents.

Qualifications and Other Job Requirements

The position starts at a salary of $40,511 (GL-5 grade level), and offers promotion potential in 4 years to the GS-12 grade level with a salary of $72,168.

Some changes to the qualifications have recently been implemented including an increase in the maximum age that applicants can be at the time of their appointment from 37 to 40 years old, and there is a waiver process if you are a veteran.

You must be a U.S. citizen to apply for the position.

Formal Training:  Attend the U.S. Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, for approximately 11 weeks of intensive instruction in immigration and nationality laws, law enforcement and Border Patrol-specific operations, drivers training, physical techniques, firearms, and other courses. All applicants will be tested on language abilities. If you score below an established benchmark, you will attend an additional 8-week Spanish language class at the border patrol academy, which will extend your stay to 19 weeks.

Firearm Proficiency: Firearm proficiency is required for Border Patrol Agents and is part of the training provided.

Driver’s License: You must possess a valid driver’s license.

One year of specialized work experience in law enforcement that demonstrates the ability to make arrests which includes the detainment of a person(s), handcuffing, restraining, arresting or containment of person(s) and/or have one year of specialized work experience that demonstrates the ability to develop and maintain contact with a network of informants, social and political organizations, state and local enforcement agencies, and private citizens, to ensure continuity of enforcement work and to carry out enforcement responsibilities.

Border Patrol Agents serve our country and protect the United States.

Additional Resources

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Security Tech. Job Fair – Homeland Security Hiring On-The-Spot

Department of Homeland Security Job Openings

DHS is seeking qualified candidates to fulfill mission-critical job openings within Cyber, Information Technology, and Human Resources. Join them for the DHS Technology Job Fair at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC, on July 27 and 28!

The DHS plans to make hundreds of on-the-spot conditional job offers at the upcoming job fair to fill mission-critical roles across the Department. They are seeking out the best and brightest computer scientists, engineers, analysts, mathematicians, problem solvers, and innovative thinkers.

The DHS offers rewarding work in Cyber, Information Technology, and Human Resources and they need your expertise in Cloud Infrastructure and Services, Agile Development, and Mobile Technologies.

They are hiring for grades GS-09, GS-11, GS-12, GS-13, GS-14, and GS-15. Salaries for these grades in the DC Metro area range from $53,435 to $160,300. Candidates must be U.S. citizens and able to obtain/maintain a Secret up to a Top Secret/SCI security clearance based upon position requirements.

The following announcements are open for this exciting event:

  1. Information Technology Specialist (INFOSEC), GS-2210-09/11. Apply at USAJOBS.
  2. Information Technology Specialist (INFOSEC), GS-2210-12/13/14. Apply at USAJOBS.
  3. Information Technology Specialist (INFOSEC), GS-2210-15. Apply at USAJOBS.
  4. Management and Program Analyst, GS-0343-12/13/14. Apply at USAJOBS.
  5. Human Resources Specialist, GS-0201-09/11/12. Apply at USAJOBS.

How to Apply

Attendees of the DHS Technology Job Fair are strongly encouraged to apply for vacancies prior to attending the event.

Fill out an application(s) on USAJOBS. Create or update your personal profile, upload your resume, and apply for one or more of the job announcements through USAJOBS. The online job application deadline is July 29, 2016.

Interview. If you apply by July 20, 2016, and meet the requisite qualifications for the role, you will receive an invitation from DHS for a specific interview slot at the job fair event on July 27-28. The invitation will provide important instructions and requirements for any additional information that should be brought to the interview. If you apply, but are not invited to interview, you are still welcome to attend the event, and your application will be maintained until January 28, 2017. The vacancy announcement will be open through July 29 should you choose to apply after attending the event, but you are not guaranteed the same expedited interview process.

Get hired! If selected, you will receive a conditional job offer on the spot and start your security clearance process the same day!

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Transportation Security Officer Jobs Available NOW

When we hear about delays at airports more often than not the delays are due to the airlines not meeting their scheduled arrival and departure times for a multitude of reasons. The delays are caused by weather, mechanical breakdowns, and other factors. Today’s delays are due to insufficient staffing of Transportation Safety Officers, SV-1802 job series positions, at airport choke points across the nations such as O’Hare airport in Chicago. The TSA is hiring hundreds of Transportation Security Officers nationwide to fill the gap. These TSA job openings will be crucial in handling these long delays.

 

Airport Metal Detector
Airport Metal Detector

The Transportation Security Agency (TSA) was transferred from the Department of Transportation to the Department of Homeland Security after the September 11th attack. I was a manager at the Greater Pittsburgh International Airport’s air traffic control tower when the TSA was transferred and I felt the move premature.

Regardless of who is managing the program the fact of the matter is that over 700 new Transportation Security Officers are needed and the TSA is hiring. They have numerous job announcements open now until the end of May and throughout the year as vacancies occur. This is a job that requires a high school education for the most part and the officer’s starting salary ranges from $15.13 to as high as $23.66 per hour with generous benefits. These TSA jobs will be available nationwide.

Selectees are required to travel a minimum of two (2) weeks in a full-time duty status to attend TSA’s New Hire training. New Hire training and travel requirements vary by duty location and may require up to six (6) weeks of full-time duty status travel. This training will occur away from the employee’s airport of record and employees are paid for compensable hours and reimbursed for authorized travel expenses. While employed with TSA, other occasional travel may be required.

Transportation Security Officers (TSOs) provide security and protection of air travelers, airports and aircraft in a courteous and professional manner. This includes:

  • Operating various screening equipment and technology to identify dangerous objects in baggage, cargo and on passengers, and preventing those objects from being transported onto aircraft.
  • Performing searches and screening, which may include physical interaction with passengers (e.g., pat-downs, search of property, etc.), conducting bag searches and lifting/carrying bags, bins, and property weighing up to 70lbs.
  • Controlling terminal entry and exit points.
  • Interacting with the public, giving directions and responding to inquiries.
  • Maintaining focus and awareness while working in a stressful environment which includes noise from alarms, machinery and people, crowd distractions, time pressure, and disruptive and angry passengers, in order to preserve the professional ability to identify and locate potentially life threatening or mass destruction devices, and to make effective decisions in both crisis and routine situations.
  • Engaging in continuous development of critical thinking skills, necessary to mitigate actual and potential security threats, by identifying, evaluating, and applying appropriate situational options and approaches. This may include application of risk-based security screening protocols that vary based on program requirements.
  • Retaining and implementing knowledge of all applicable Standard Operating Procedures, demonstrating responsible and dependable behavior, and is open to change and adapts to new information or unexpected obstacles.

Key Requirements

  • Be a U.S. Citizen or U.S. National at time of application submission
  • Be at least 18 years of age at time of application submission
  • Pass a Drug Screening and Medical Evaluation
  • Pass a background investigation including a credit and criminal check
  • No default on $7,500 or more in delinquent debt (but for some bankruptcies)
  • Selective Service registration required

Qualifications

Applicants must meet these qualifications in order to be further evaluated in the TSO hiring process:

  • Have a high school diploma or General Educational Development (GED) credential OR at least one year of full-time work experience in the security industry, aviation screening, or as an X-ray technician
  • Be proficient in the English language (i.e., able to read, write, speak, and comprehend)

Current Job Openings

Job announcements are now open from 5/18/ to 5/31/2016 so you have to act NOW. Click on the following link to learn more about TSA jobs and to find job vacancy announcements. Positons can be advertised at any time as vacancies occur.  Check for open job announcements frequently.

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The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Special Agent in Charge (GS-1811)

The GS-1811 series includes all classes of positions, the duties of which are to advise on, administer, supervise, or perform investigation, inspection, or enforcement work primarily concerned with alleged or suspected offenses against the laws of the United States, or such work primarily concerned with determining compliance with laws and regulations.

There are 192,929 federal workers employed in the GS-1800 Investigation Group working within all Executive Branch departments, and in many large and small independent agencies with 3,800 employed overseas. Even small agencies employ investigators including the Federal Maritime Election Commission (3), and 15 with the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.

Keith Toomey, is a special agent in charge, with the Fish & Wildlife Service’s Professional Responsibility Unit, in Shepherdstown, WV.

 

Keith Toomy, Special Agent in Charge (FWS)
Keith Toomy, Special Agent in Charge (FWS)

The largest employers of the Investigative Group are the Department of Homeland Security (130,343), 28,541 with the Department of Justice, the Department of Agriculture employs 8,126, and there are 3,802 employed with the Department of Transportation. All of the cabinet level agencies employ workers in the GS-1800 group with 34,265 in the GS-1801 general inspection, investigation, enforcement and compliance series, 42,442 in the GS-1811 criminal investigation position, over 20,000 in border patrol enforcement GS-1896, and 21,038 in the GS-1985 customs and border protection.

Don’t overlook any agency in your job search as there are positions available in most agencies.

Q and A with Keith Toomey

Why did you want to become a Special Agent in Charge? I felt it was a great responsibility and challenge to lead this office. It provided stability to the office and has allowed our program to continue to develop and evolve. I was lucky to have many great mentors at the county, state and federal level as my career progressed like Danny James and Nick Susalis to name a few. This position has allowed me to share some of that experience, but as General Gray said when I joined the Marine Corps years ago “you are first and foremost a rifleman, everything else is secondary.”  I still consider myself a working agent and handle a case load.  I think it’s important to stay current and connected to those investigative skills.

What is the most challenging part of your job? The most challenging part of this particular position is trying to balance the caseload against the amount of time our PRU agents are traveling away from their families handling cases nationwide and the stress that results from that time away.

What is the most dangerous part of your job? This profession at any level has been and will always be inherently dangerous. I constantly remind our officers and agents they need to have the courage to take decisive action when required and not worry about the current level of anti-police rhetoric in the public or press.  We were called to be and the Service employs us to be law enforcement officers which at times means things will not always be pretty or easy.  We need to be safe and go home when the work is done.

What is the best part of being a Special Agent in Charge? The best part of this position is the daily diversity.  We handle a variety of cases for the Service besides traditional Internal Affairs issues and we teach at many levels within the Service and to outside agencies as well.  We are also very lucky being located within Jefferson County, WV to have a great working relationship with the local Sheriff’s Office and State Police.

Would you recommend this job occupation? I would recommend this position but it is not for everyone.  I think the same goes for the profession as a whole.  This occupation is dangerous, challenging and requires a ton of common sense along with communication skills.  There will be internal and external political frictions each requiring your attention and tactful handling. At the end of day, it is also a very satisfying and rewarding career as long has you have the moral courage for it.

Office of Law Enforcement

The Fish and Wildlife Service’s Office of Law Enforcement is responsible for focusing on threats to wildlife that are detrimental.  These threats involve illegal trade, unlawful commercial exploitation, habitat destruction, and environmental contaminants. They will investigate wildlife crimes, regulates wildlife trade, helps Americans understand and obey wildlife protections laws, and works in partnership with international, state, and tribal counterparts to conserve wildlife resources.

The work of this office includes:

  • Breaking up international and domestic smuggling rings that target imperiled animals.
  • Preventing the unlawful commercial exploitation of protected U.S. species.
  • Protecting wildlife from environmental hazards and safeguarding critical habitat for endangered species.
  • Enforcing federal migratory game bird hunting regulations and working with states to protect other game species from illegal take and preserve legitimate hunting opportunities.
  • Distributing information and outreach materials to increase public understanding of wildlife conservation and promote compliance with wildlife protection laws.
  • Inspecting wildlife shipments to ensure compliance with laws and treaties and detect illegal trade.
  • Working with international counterparts to combat illegal trafficking in protected species.
  • Training other federal, state, tribal, and foreign law enforcement officers.
  • Using forensic science to analyze evidence and solve wildlife crimes.

When fully staffed, the Office of Law Enforcement includes 261 special agents and some 140 wildlife inspectors. Most are “officers on the beat” who report through eight regional law enforcement offices. A headquarters Office of Law Enforcement provides national oversight, support, policy, and guidance for Service investigations and the wildlife inspection program; trains Service law enforcement personnel; fields a special investigations unit; and provides budget, management and administrative support for the Office of Law Enforcement.

The Office of Law Enforcement has the Clark R. Bavin National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory which conducts scientific analyses that support federal, state, and international investigations of wildlife crime. They also maintain a National Wildlife Property Repository, which supplies abandoned and forfeited wildlife items to schools, universities, museums, and non-government organizations for public education, and operates the National Eagle Repository, which meets the needs of Native Americans for eagles and eagle feathers for religious use.

Job Requirements of a GS-1811

  • Must be a U.S. citizen to apply
  • Salary ranges from $87,263 to $113,444.00 per year.
  • Provides expert technical advice, guidance, and recommendations concerning tactical field operations and the application and use of criminal investigative techniques to subordinates, other law enforcement partners
  • Plans and oversees tactical field operations, case administration, and the supervision and management of the criminal investigative unit.
  • Directing a comprehensive criminal investigative program that has handled all aspects of the criminal investigative process.
  • Directly managing/supervising law enforcement agents and analysts.
  • Maintaining liaison with other local, state, and federal law enforcement counterparts.

The GS-1811 job series covers positions which supervise, lead, or perform work involving planning, conducting, or managing investigations related to alleged or suspected criminal violations of Federal laws. The federal government employs 42,442 in this occupation. The work involves:

  • recognizing, developing, and presenting evidence to reconstruct events, sequences, time elements, relationships, responsibilities, legal liabilities, and conflicts of interest;
  • conducting investigations in a manner meeting legal and procedural requirements; and
  • providing advice and assistance both in and out of court to the U.S. Attorney’s Office during investigations and prosecutions.

Work in this series primarily requires knowledge of criminal investigative techniques, rules of criminal procedures, laws, and precedent court decisions concerning the admissibility of evidence, constitutional rights, search and seizure, and related issues in the conduct of investigations. Criminal investigators conduct investigations of alleged or suspected criminal violations of Federal laws. The Federal statute or law which may have been violated does not determine whether a position should be classified in this series. The actual process and the knowledge and skills used to investigate crimes determine the appropriate series of the position. Classification into the 1811 series should not be an automatic process but should be based on the work of the individual position. Work primarily requires knowledge of:

  • pertinent statutes, regulations, policies, and guidelines, including the Code of Federal Regulations or the Uniform Code of Military Justice;
  • Federal Rules of Criminal Procedures, Federal Sentencing Guidelines, and Federal guidelines on the conduct of criminal investigations;
  • criminal investigative techniques, such as protective surveys and assignments, surveillance, and undercover work;
  • the evidence required to prove a crime was committed;
  • the jurisdiction of various agencies;
  • sources of information and how to develop them (e.g., informants, surveillance, and undercover work);
  • electronic countermeasures and the latest technological advances used by criminals and investigators; and
  • decisions and precedent cases involving, but not limited to, rules of evidence, search and seizure, and detention and arrest.

Criminal investigative work is characterized by the types and scope of crimes investigated and the organization and sophistication of the criminals. Additional characteristics of criminal investigative work include: planning and conducting investigations extending over protracted periods of time; assignments made primarily on a referral or case basis; and an emphasis on identifying and apprehending individuals for criminal prosecution. During the course of their careers, criminal investigators may rotate through various assignments to include protective details, asset forfeiture investigations, and multi-jurisdictional task forces.   Some criminal investigators perform or oversee undercover assignments as a regular and recurring part of their assigned duties. Criminal investigator positions will normally be found in organizations whose primary purpose includes functions typically performed by criminal investigators, such as organizations responsible for performing inspection, compliance, enforcement, prevention, or deterrence functions.

Medical Requirements

  • The duties of positions in this series require moderate to arduous physical exertion involving walking and standing, use of firearms, and exposure to inclement weather.
  • Manual dexterity with comparatively free motion of finger, wrist, elbow, shoulder, hip, and knee joints is required. Arms, hands, legs, and feet must be sufficiently intact and functioning in order that applicants may perform the duties satisfactorily.
  • Sufficiently good vision in each eye, with or without correction, is required to perform the duties satisfactorily. Near vision, corrective lenses permitted, must be sufficient to read printed material the size of typewritten characters.
  • Duties of these positions are exacting and responsible, and involve activities under trying conditions, applicants must possess emotional and mental stability.
  • Any physical condition that would cause the applicant to be a hazard to

The special agent in charge is a very specialized job series.  It involves skills such as problem solving, use of fire arms, knowledge of various law enforcement regulations, tactical field operations, criminal investigation and analysis. This is a job occupation worth checking out.

Credits

  • Anita Noguera, Manager, BPHC Marketing Communications, Falls Church, VA
  • Photos were provided by the Fish and Wildlife Service

Other Career Information

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.