Secret Service Jobs – Special Agents and Administrative Support Jobs (Part 3)

U.S. Secret Service Jobs

This is the final installment of part 3 part of this series about the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). We will finish up with the U.S. Secret Service. The Secret Service was originally part of the U.S. Department of Treasury. It was put under DHS in 2003. The Secret Service was initially responsible for investigating counterfeiting of U.S. currency, which very prevalent after the Civil War. It eventually became the first domestic intelligence and counterintelligence agency.

The Secret Service is the oldest investigative law enforcement agency. Their dual mission is to “safeguard the nation’s financial infrastructure and payment systems to preserve the integrity of the economy, and to protect national leaders, visiting heads of state and government, designated sites and National Special Security Events”.

The Secret Service headquarters are in Washington, D.C., with over 136 field offices around the country. This agency is mandated by Congress to carry out their dual mission of protection and criminal investigations. One of their most important roles is to protect the President, Vice President, former presidents, visiting heads of states and major presidential and vice presidential candidates.

Special Agent

One of the more exciting careers is that of the special agent, GS-1811, and are hired at either the GL-7 level ($48,177 to $59,516), or GL-9 level ($53,728 to $67,589).

All secret service positions require a top-secret security clearance. Additionally, the applicant must meet specific suitability criteria. You must be a U.S. citizen, and there are age, vision, and physical condition requirements. You must be at least 21 years of age, and under 37 years of age to apply. A bachelor’s degree is required for the GL-7 level. The GL-9 level you must have a Master’s degree or 1 year equivalent to the GL-7.

There are 10 weeks of training at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC), Basic Criminal Investigator Training in Glycol, GA, and 17 weeks of Special Agent Basic Training at James J. Rowley Training Center. An agent must show proficiency in the handling of firearms, and maintain that proficiency.

Administrative Support Positions within the Secret Service

The following list of administrative positions involve knowledge of principles and concepts that are applicable to a variety of fields to include research, critical thinking, writing, and judgment.

Administrative Officer

The administrative officer, GS-0341-11/12 salary ranges from $60,212 (GS-11) with a promotion potential to $93,818 (GS-12) U.S. citizenship is a requirement for this position. To qualify for a GS-11 or GS-12 position you must have 1 year of specialized experience at the next lowest grade level (GS-09 or GS-11 respectively).

There is a wide range of duties that include planning, forecasting, presenting, tracking, and monitoring administrative and associated management services that are essential for effective operations.

An administrative officer has oversight over various program activities that are both short and long-range in duration. They must be able to estimate expenditures, coordinate, and track the expenditures associated with procurements of equipment, space, and supplies.

Other duties include initiating personnel actions and managing and assigning work to other administrative personnel. They participate in strategic planning, and serve as a key advisor to management on a wide range of administrative policies and procedures.

Investigative Support Assistant

The investigative support assistant, GS-1802, has a starting salary of $36,612 (GS-06) and a promotion potential to $58,576 (GS-08). You must be a U.S. citizen to apply and must have a top-secret clearance. To qualify for the GS-06 or GS-07 level you must have at least 1 year of experience at the next lowest grade (GS-05 or GS-06 respectively).

Responsibilities include preparation of correspondence, time, and attendance records, answer phones, process incoming and outgoing mail. Open and maintain case files, process and track evidence, and provide the necessary administrative support to special agent’s investigations, which include counterfeit and financial crimes.

They also conduct preliminary searches and input relevant data into criminal databases to help in the development of background information and compile criminal history statistics and reports.

Assist agents in preparing surveys, compile information for various reports and act as a liaison to local, state and other federal law enforcement agencies and share information and provide assistance as required.

Other interesting jobs include, polygraph support assistant, GS-303, investigative support assistant, GS-1802 and fingerprint specialist, GS-0072.

The Secret Service has over 136 field offices around the country and offices in such countries as Brazil, Canada, Germany, Mexico, Netherlands/The Hague, to name just a few. This agency offers an array of unique employment opportunities for applicants.



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The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Federal Air Marshal and Transportation Security Specialist Jobs

Working for the Department of Homeland Security (Part 2)

Higher levels of security are now a way of life at airports. On the front lines in this effort is the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). Here is a sampling of the employment opportunities that TSA has to offer.

Federal Air Marshal Jobs

TSA employs federal air marshals, and this job category is part of the Office of Law Enforcement/Federal Air Marshal Service. The federal air marshals help to protect the flying public, but also work closely with other law enforcement agencies.

Federal air marshals fly on an average of 181 days per year, which is almost 900 hours and equates to 5 hours per day in the air. They must evaluate and discern suspicious activity, conduct investigations in order to protect the flying public and crew from terrorist violence. They also work with other law enforcement agencies.

The job series is GL-0082, and the pay is based on pay bands, that are different from other law enforcement in other agencies. Pay band G, ranges in salaries from $39,358 to $60,982, band H, ranges from $48,007 to $74,390, and band I, ranges from $58,495 to $90,717.

You must be a U.S. citizen and at least 21 to apply and no older than 37 years of age. You need at least three (3) years of general experience, one (1) year of which is equivalent to the F Band (or GS-4 grade level) or a bachelor’s degree and 1 year of work experience equivalent to a GS-4 to qualify for the position.  You can also qualify with a combination of both experience and education. Recruits attend a residential training course at Artesia, NM that is 7 weeks in length. There is additional training at the Federal Air Marshal Training Academy in Atlantic City, NJ.

Air marshals are used to staff other organizations such as the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Forces, National Counterterrisom Center, and the National Targeting Center.

Transportation Security Specialist Jobs

The transportation security specialist, (SV 1801-J) is part of the General Inspection, Enforcement, and Compliance job series. The salary range is from $89,535 to $138,776. You must either be a U.S. citizen or be U.S. National to apply for the position. This position is in a SV-J pay band, which is equivalent to a GS-14. To qualify for SV-J pay band you must have specialized experience at the SV-I pay band or at GS-13.

A transportation security specialist can serve in many capacities, such as a liaison for the Office of Security Operations. The liaison office for TSA is at the National Targeting Center – Cargo (NTC-C). Personnel from several agencies such as Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation staff the NTC-C.
At NTC-C, the transportation security specialist would be involved in securing air cargo. One example is identifying high-risk cargo shipments in the Air Cargo Advanced Screening (ACAS) program. This program provides tools necessary to enable risk-based, intelligence-driven approach to be applied to transportation security.

A transportation security specialist is considered part of the Office of Law Enforcement, Office of Security. The primary duties include monitoring, coordinating criminal and administrative investigations of non-TSA personnel. These types of investigations could lead to possible criminal, civil, or administrative actions in protecting and securing TSA facilities.

Transportation security specialists are also involved in policy development. This includes writing new policies, to revising exiting ones. They are responsible in the coordination from various branches, agencies, managers and other stakeholders relevant to written policies. Another important aspect of their duties is to ensure that documents are clear and concise; addressing risks and is from a sound regulatory framework.

The TSA has a responsibility to protect the nation’s transportation systems to ensure freedom of movement of people and commerce. There many great job opportunities such as security specialist, SV-0080/G-H, program analyst,
SV-0343/H-I, and transportation security officer (TSO), SV-1802/D.

In part 3 of this series on DHS, we will look at the Secret Service and the interesting role this agency plays in protecting our country.

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The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Working for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

How would you like to work for the Federal Government’s premiere spy agency? The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has been in the spy business for 67 years and there are many lucrative job opportunities that await you.

History

The United States has used spies since this country’s inception. Even George Washington, our first president, used spies during the Revolutionary War. The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was the precursor to the CIA. The OSS was formed during World War II, and collected and analyzed information. Once World War II ended, the OSS was eliminated; other war agencies were transferred to the State and War departments.

President Harry Truman realized that a centralized intelligence organization was necessary. In 1947, he signed the National Security Act and the CIA was born. The CIA is responsible for the coordination of the nation’s intelligence activities, as well as, correlating, evaluating, and disseminating intelligence affecting national security.

In 2004, President George W. Bush restructured the CIA by signing the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act. This act established the position of Director of National Intelligence (D/CIA) and the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) within the CIA. The DNI oversees the Intelligence Community and the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC).

The CIA of Today

The CIA is comprised of 4 main organizations. The CIA website states, “They carry out ‘the intelligence cycle,’ the process of collecting, analyzing, and disseminating intelligence information to top US government officials.”

Each of these 4 organizations provide the following unique support functions:

  • The National Clandestine Service (NCS) collects foreign intelligence, specifically human source intelligence (HUMINT). CIA officers live and work overseas to establish a network of human “assets” in the field.
  • The Directorate of Intelligence (DI) analyzes a variety of sourced material and provides reports, briefings, and papers on foreign intelligence issues. Their intelligence analysis helps in the formulation of policy that senior policy makers can use.
  • The Directorate of Science and Technology (DS&T) is responsible for using state of the art technology in the assessment and collection of information. They use the expertise from various disciplines that include computer programmers, scientists, and analysts for these assessments.
  • The Directorate of Support (DS) provides international clandestine. They are responsible for financial and medical services, logistics, and the security of CIA personnel. This directorate also offers support within the Intelligence Community.

The People Who Work for the CIA

The mission of the CIA is to “Preempt threats and further US national security objectives by collecting intelligence that matters, producing objective all-source analysis, conducting effective covert action as directed by the President, and safeguarding the secrets that help keep our Nation safe.”

The CIA has many exciting career opportunities from a variety of professions. These include Analysts (operations research GS-1515), Scientists (GS-1300), Engineers (GS-800 Series), cyber security, information assurance, logistics, and Medical services (GS-600). You must be a U.S. citizen to apply for any jobs in the CIA. The main headquarters is in Washington, D.C.

In the Clandestine Service, there is a Core Collector career path. This career path offers 2 entry-level programs, one for ages 21-25 and 26-35. A Core Collector works full time in the Washington, D.C. area and the salary range is from $53,508 to $82,019 depending on time in grade and experience.

The 21-25 year old group goes through the Professional Trainee (PT) Program. They have to have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree. The program gives a person the opportunity to gain valuable experience in different areas at the Washington D.C. headquarters. These assignments help in the training and field deployment.

The 26-35 year old group goes through The Clandestine Service (CST) Program. This is an 18 month long program. The applicant must have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree. In addition, they should also have several years of business and or military experience.

The Core Collector career path has 2 primary job categories. They are designated as either Core Collection Operations Officers (OO) or Collection Management Officers (CMO). In either category, the person is required to be fully engaged in all the activities relevant to clandestine operations while in overseas assignments.

Another unique and interesting career path is Counterintelligence Threat Analyst. This is a full time position, with a salary range from $50,861 to $98,305 and maybe paid higher depending upon a person’s level of experience. An applicant will need a bachelors or a master’s degree in such fields as security, electrical engineering, telecommunications field and a mix of international and technical areas.

The Counterintelligence (CI) analyst has to identify, monitor, and review foreign intelligence entities, who try to collect sensitive security information on U.S. persons, emerging technologies, and other areas of national interest. They collaborate with other intelligence counterparts, produce both long and short-term written assessments, and can brief U.S. policy makers.

The CIA is responsible for protecting our country and their mission is to provide information, insights, and actions that are in support of a tactical and strategic advantage for the United States.

So if you can keep a secret and want to work for the premiere spy agency, then check out the CIA.

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The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officer Jobs

In part one of this series, we discussed a brief history of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and its role in protecting our America’s borders. In addition, the U.S. Border Patrol Agent was featured, today in this final part of this two part series, the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officer will be discussed. I interviewed two CBP Officers for this second article.

The CBP Officer’s role is different from that of the U.S. Border Patrol Agent. The CBP Officer enforces laws that secure our borders and fight terrorism. They work in airports and seaports examining cargo and passengers at border stations. On the other hand, U.S. Border Patrol Agents track illegal immigration and smuggling primarily along the Mexican and Canadian borders. Both the Border Patrol Agent and the CBP Officer together help to fight domestic and foreign terrorism.

Economics play an integral role in the security of our borders. According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Field Operations, they “help drive our Nation’s economic engine by facilitating lawful international trade and travel through the enforcement of hundreds of U.S. laws and regulations ranging from agriculture to intellectual property rights”.

Natalia Papachoris, Chief CBP Officer, GS-13 wanted to become a CBP Officer because it offered her the opportunity to do something that she knew would be a challenge. She stated, “I also knew it would be very rewarding. I knew I would receive invaluable training, and that this career would allow me the opportunity to positively impact many people’s lives. As an officer, I am able to interact with hundreds of travelers every day, and I work with some of the most amazing people from all parts of the country.”

Officer Papachoris gets satisfaction from knowing that all of the work the agency does has a great impact on the nation. She states, ” Of course, everyone hears about the very exciting enforcement work we do, which is outstanding; but we also do so much more! A big part of our job entails facilitating trade and tourism into the Unites States. It is very rewarding to know that the work we do not only keeps bad things and bad people out of the country, but it also has a positive impact on the US economy every day.”

The most rewarding part of her job is that she sees the clear outcomes of her work. Natalia explains that, “whether apprehending and denying entry to a traveler with nefarious intentions or seizing harmful contraband, I know my efforts make a difference. I enjoy the constantly varied challenges that are put in front of me and the ability to be flexible and adaptable to solve the problems. I am motivated by the encouragement I receive to think outside the box and be creative.”

Officer Papachoris would advise people entering the field that, “this job has unlimited opportunities. Not only do we have officers working in most every part of the country, but we have international positions as well. The work we do entails so many different jobs; a new officer will have so many possibilities.”

She further states, “We are the first line of defense on our borders! We are responsible for protecting against terrorists, apprehending individuals who attempt to enter the US illegally; for interdicting illegal drugs and other contraband, and we also protect our agricultural and economic interests from harmful pests and diseases. Most importantly, what other job can offer so much? ”

Tommy Sutton, CBP Officer/Program Manager, GS13 applied to CBP out of a fascination with international travel and the desire to be part of one of the greatest missions in protecting our homeland. He stated that, ” whether returning from an international flight or walking across an international border, I would take notice of the CBP officers performing their various functions and be interested in their work. It was clear that they were applying sharp thinking and expert problem solving to quickly make determinations and follow up possible issues with people and things that might not have been lawful. Further, I liked the thought of being part of an agency and tradition that was nearly as old as our country itself. I felt that being part of CBP would be an exciting career.”

Officer Sutton finds his working for CBP rewarding because he can see the clear outcomes of his efforts. He advises those pursuing employment with CBP that, ” you only live once. You owe it yourself to choose an exciting, fun and challenging career. CBP offers limitless opportunities to pursue throughout your career. Whether you chose to stay here at home or venture out to locations throughout the world, you will be met daily with interesting and important work. You will know that you have tangibly and relevantly had a big part in protecting our homeland and the American people.”

The roles of the CBP Officer and the U.S. Border Patrol Agent are our first line of defense in securing our borders and for our fight against terrorism. The goal of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection is to provide the best possible security, this agency will have a lasting impact by protecting our country. According to the a recent announcement, CBP will hire 2,000 additional officers by the end of fiscal year 2015 to enhance security, help reduce wait times and facilitate growing volumes of legitimate goods and travelers that are critical to the health of our Nation’s economy.

Additional resources:

The economic benefit of a single CBP officer
Law Enforcement Jobs

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The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

 

U.S. Border Patrol Agents – Working for U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Every time we turn on the news today border control and immigration is a hot news topic. Tens of thousands of unaccompanied children are crossing our border monthly and flooding the already overtaxed customs and border protection services. Major immigration overall is a legislative priority as the new arrivals and the 11 million or so undocumented residents must be dealt with. There are many border patrol job opportunities currently available and many more to come as necessary funding is approved to improve border security.

Have you ever wondered what a U.S. Border Patrol Agent really does?  This article will explore various facets of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) service. With over 60,000 employees, CBP, is one of the largest law enforcement organizations in the world. It’s missions is to keep terrorists and their weapons out of the U.S. while facilitating international trade and travel within the guidelines of our laws. Border Patrol is a department within CBP.

In part one of the series; we will cover what it is like to work for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection service, featuring U.S. Border Patrol Agents. Part two of the series will cover the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officer.

Prior to1921 border control was not an apparent priority for the U.S. Government.  Things changed when on January 16, 1920, the 18th Amendment to the Constitution, prohibiting the making, importation, and distribution of alcohol beverages became effective. Additionally, the U.S. Government was limiting the number of immigrants coming to the United States.

Because of these two events, protecting the U.S. border was becoming more important and in 1924, the U.S. Border Patrol was established. Its mission is to be “guardians of our nation’s borders”.  Initially the U.S. Border Patrol only staffed  inspection stations and in 1925 seaports were added. Their role has expanded over the years and today, it is called U.S. Customs and Border Protection, which is part of the Department of Homeland Security.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection service is the guardian of our nation’s borders and safeguard the American homeland at and beyond our borders. While living in Arizona, in the Sierra Vista area, (60 miles from the Mexico border), whenever I would travel to Tucson, I encountered several U.S. Border Patrol Agents.  They would inspect underneath the vehicle and ask to see my ID. I was grateful for what they were doing to protect our nation.

A U.S Border Patrol Agent must be a U.S. citizen, have a valid driver’s license, and pass the CBP Border Patrol examination. They must also either know or learn to speak Spanish, and their application is assessed for relevant job-related experiences and achievements.  Review the GS-1896 Qualification Standard for  complete information on how to qualify for positions from entry level to higher grade positions.

Additionally, U.S. Border Patrol Agents must be under 37 years of age, the pay grades go from GS-1896-05 to GS-1896-12, the education can range from high school to a masters degree depending upon the job.  Agents must pass a thorough background check, medical examination, drug test, and fitness test.  New hires are sent for 55 days of training at the CBP Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, N.M. The training includes immigration and nationality regulations and laws, Spanish, physical fitness and marksmanship.  There is an additional 40 days for those who need to master Spanish.

U.S. Border Patrol Agents must work overtime and shift work hours often under very harsh conditions and they are subject to random drug tests. Their assignments can be for a short duration or permanent reassignments to any duty location. Every Agent starts their assignments along the Southwest border. They are ultimately responsible for preventing illegal immigrants from crossing the U.S. border, and can confiscate various items that maybe smuggled into our country.

For this article, I interviewed three U.S. Border Patrol Agents from varied backgrounds; all were GS-12s and they replied to the following questions:

  1. Name of Agent, job title and grade.
  2. Why did you join the Border Patrol?
  3. What is the most rewarding part of your job?
  4. What would you say to a young person that would make them want to      work for the Border Patrol?

Here are the interviewee’s answers:

1.  Name of Agent, job title, and grade.

Jacopo Bruni, Border Patrol Agent, GS-12

2.  Why did you join the Border Patrol?

I always had an interest in Law Enforcement. As a recent college graduate with a degree in Criminal Justice, I was looking for a career that would bring adventure, challenges, and satisfaction. The Border Patrol gave me the opportunity to work in my field of study, to see and live in a new part of the country, and to be part of something bigger: the agency responsible with protecting America at the frontline.

3.  What is the most rewarding part of your job?

There are many challenges in the environment we work in. I have found that if you want to be successful, you must work as a team.  The most rewarding part of my career is taking on a difficult task with a team of hard working individuals with different backgrounds to overcome challenges and accomplish goals.

4.  What would you say to a young person that would make them want to work for the Border Patrol?

If you are an ambitious, hardworking, and persistent person, you are off to a good start, because you will need all these traits to be successful.  Our core values are Integrity, Vigilance, and Service to Country. If these align with your own personal values, you will find this career very rewarding.

1.    Name of Agent, job title and grade.

Michael Scappechio, Border Patrol Agent, GS-12

2.    Why did you join the Border Patrol?

Ever since I was a young kid, I knew, and was told by others, that I would work in public service. I had always considered law enforcement, but began to pursue a path in Emergency Medical Response and firefighting.  When I was 18, I began volunteering for a city fire department. Within the department, I met a Border Patrol Agent who explained his career to me. The pride he exuded for the work he did, and the stories that he told made the United States Border Patrol an instant attraction.

3.    What is the most rewarding part of your job?

Simple. Every day is different, and every day is spent with professionals who share a common goal and passion for their work. I am confident that this career will continue to provide this type of work environment for the long haul. In addition, the laws that we enforce and the strategies that deploy are designed to protect America at the first line of defense. Being a part of the effort to protect this country gives me great pride.

 4.    What would you say to a young person that would make them want to work for the Border Patrol?

I was young when the Border Patrol accepted me into their work force. The agency has provided me invaluable skills such as interpersonal, organizational, leadership and public speaking skills. They trusted me, and judged me by my performance, not my age. They provided me premier training, and continue to do so on a regular basis. Through our valuable mentorship program, and career-growth resources, advancement opportunities continue to present themselves. The sky’s the limit. For these reasons, I feel an overwhelming sense of loyalty and appreciation for my agency. They’ll have to kick me out.

1.    Name of Agent, job title and grade.

Matthew Trombley, Border Patrol Agent, GS-12

2.    Why did you join the Border Patrol?

I wanted to join the Border Patrol because every Border Patrol Agent I ever spoke with really enjoyed their job. The wide range of opportunities the Border Patrol offered really interested me. For example, the average Border Patrol Agent has opportunity to perform a vast array of duties such as line watch duties, checkpoint duties, boat patrol, bike patrol, horse patrol, ATV patrols, sensor duties, prosecutions duties the list goes on.

3.    What is the most rewarding part of your job?

Each day as a United States Border Patrol Agent will present itself with various unknown challenges. Overcoming these challenges and gaining experience how to deal with the next challenge while completing the mission of the Border Patrol is very rewarding.

4.    What would you say to a young person that would make them want to work for the Border Patrol?           

I really enjoy my job with the Border Patrol. The Border Patrol is more than a  job it will be a job you will want as a career and a job that will become a way of life.

Part two of this series is about CBP Officers. Here are several links, one is to a vacancy announcement specifically for CBP Officers, and the other talks about their hiring initiatives:

The men and women of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection are our first defense against our borders from terrorists and others whom may want to do harm to the United States.  Their dedication, loyalty, and integrity are unsurpassed in the fight against enemies both foreign and domestic.

If you are interested in a border patrol job you should explore your options and also consider  related federal law enforcement jobs in your area. Seek out all federal job announcements and apply for any vacancy that you meet the basic qualifications for.

Additional Resources

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Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

 

Law Enforcement, Investigation, Compliance, & Inspection Jobs

The GS-1800 federal investigation occupational group includes positions with duties to administer, advise, supervise, or perform various investigations, inspections, or law enforcement duties. Federal agents and inspectors investigate suspected and alleged criminal offenses against the United States, or perform activities to determine compliance with various federal laws and regulations. The investigation group includes a broad cross section of occupations from general and criminal investigators to customs, immigration, safety and food inspectors and everything in between including securities compliance and air safety.

If you have law enforcement or compliance related experience, an associated college degree, or soon will earn one, there are many opportunities for you to explore. For those who are still pursuing a degree definitely seek out federal agency internships that often end with a full time high paying job. Many law enforcement, investigation, compliance, and inspection job announcements are now available across the country and overseas. Federal, State, and local governments along with private sector companies are competing for qualified applicants. In the federal sector agencies can offer tuition assistance payments of up to $60,000 for hard to fill vacancies as a bonus for signing on with Uncle Sam.

Opportunities are currently available in many fields. A recent search on USAJobs resulted in 1260 job vacancies listed on 103 job announcements, many with multiple locations and positions. For example, the Department of Agriculture is hiring over 1,000 Food Safety and Inspection jobs through June 30th at many locations with a salary range of from $31,628 to $50,932 per year. The Department of Labor is hiring 23 Mine Safety Inspectors at multiple locations and the Department of  Homeland Security is hiring many Transportation Security Officers around the county with a salary range of from $29,422 to $44,134 per year.

To access all available jobs in this group on USAJobs.gov perform the following steps:

  • click on “Advance Search” listed under the blue Search button.
  • Then click on “Occupational Series or Job Category.”  A list of all job series will be displayed on your screen.
  • Enter “1800” in the “Search For Occupation(s)” block and click on enter. This will display “Series 1800” in the  search results box.
  • Click on the check box next to the 1800 entry and click enter.
  • Go the bottom of the page and click on “Search Jobs”

All currently available job announcements for this group will be displayed.

Review the list and click on the title of a job of interest to view the job announcement, qualifications, and application procedures.

Register on USAJobs to start your federal job search. Also, don’t be discouraged if the job announcement qualifications require a BS degree and you don’t have one. Continue reading the announcement and you will find in many cases that the requirement is a BS degree OR 3 years general experience! Many exclude highly desirable jobs because they don’t read the entire job announcement.

The above search is limited to the federal sector, you should also explore similar or related occupations with State and local government and in the private sector.

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Federal Jobs in the FAST Lane

Federal recruiting dropped off appreciably over the past couple of years due to cost cutting initiatives within the federal sector. Federal job opportunities are returning and substantially within certain agencies and occupations . It was recently reported that 700 FBI jobs will be filled shortly and other agencies are following their lead.

Many federal job announcements are being posted for openings across the country and overseas. Things are a little different this time around since the Office of Personnel Management (OPM ) changed their USAJobs job listing format a few years ago. When you visited their site, prior to the change, there appeared to be many more federal job listings. They now list jobs with multiple vacancies when appropriate and the number of individual federal job listings has decreased as a result.  It is also a good practice to check for new listings frequently because many jobs, especially ones that typically receive many applicants, are often advertised for shorter periods.

There are abundant opportunities in many occupations now including engineering jobs in multiple disciplines. A recent search resulted in 573 job announcements. many with multiple positions ranging from 2 to as high as 35 just in the first 26 listings. The first 26 federal job listings resulted in 115 job vacancies! One of the Electronic Engineer (GS-0855) job announcements is recruiting at 35 different  locations across the country, in Canada, and overseas.  It’s important to read the job announcement thoroughly and when you have multiple locations you will be asked your preference.  The more willing you are to relocate the better you chances of landing a job. I accepted my first competitive federal  job in a small town in Central Pennsylvania to get my foot in the door and I bid on multiple position to improve my chances. It worked!

Job opportunities are available now in many occupations, just perform a search for the occupation and location you desire and review all of the job announcements of interest.  Other hot occupations:

Each of my upcoming articles will feature current hot careers and job opportunities.  Search by occupation to find jobs in federal, state, and the private sector. You will also find relevant  USAJobs searches for each occupation if you desire to limit your search to the federal sector.

More Information

How to Apply For a Federal Job Step-by-step guidance on how to apply for government jobs

Do I Have to Take a Civil Service Exam? Discover if a civil service exam is required for your occupation

Federal Job Vacancies

Federal jobs comprise approximately 2 percent of this country’s total workforce and Uncle Sam is this country’s largest employer by far.  If you are out-of-work or looking for a higher paying, benefit loaded, and secure job consider applying for federal job vacancies in your area.  The average salary exceeds $83,000  and when you add pay plus benefits that figure increases to over $125,000 a year compared to less than half that in the private sector.

Federal Job Listings

Federal job vacancies are available in all major metropolitan areas and in many rural locations as well. I started my competitive federal civil service career with the Federal Aviation Administration working at a small airport in central Pennsylvania. You will find federal job listings by occupation and by agency plus OPM offers extensive job search and guidance on their USAJobs site.

Federal Job Announcements and Occupations

You will find federal jobs in almost all occupations, from direct sales to nuclear scientists and everything in between. There are over 900 occupational titles to consider and what most federal job seekers don’t realize is that a published qualification standard is available for all occupations that outlines specific skills, knowledge, experience,  and education required for the position. The qualification standards along with the federal job announcement provide considerable information for the applicant and they should be read thoroughly prior to applying for any job.

Careers and Job Exploration

To locate federal job vacancies and to explore opportunities at agencies in your area visit their web sites:

More Information

How to Apply For a Federal Job
Step-by-step guidance on how to apply for government jobs

Do I Have to Take a Civil Service Exam?
Discover if a civil service exam is required for your occupation

Welcome to the FederalJobs.Net Blog

This is the first of many articles to help job seekers find, apply for, and land a high paying and secure federal government job. The articles will cover all aspects of federal employment from entry level jobs to Senior Executive Service (SES) positions, federal  benefits, to pay and career exploration. We will also help you cope with the often stressful federal job interview.

Our site,  www.federaljobs.net,  provides easy to find information about all aspects of federal employment including expanded centralized job listings.  Our job searches compile listings from both the private and federal sectors by occupation and /or agency to provide the largest pool of job vacancies for you to explore. The job searches are geographically targeted to your area.  Unlike most job listing services we also offer abundant information on all aspects of the federal sector to prepare you for your new job. It isn’t enough to simply apply for a job vacancy, you need to know about how the federal sector functions, what your benefits will be, the work environment, and how to understand the various pay systems,  pay structure and upward mobility potential.

Use this site to locate federal job announcements and for assistance with completing your federal application and resume and to prepare for civil service exams if required.  You can explore job vacancies by occupations or agency plus learn how to best prepare for a federal job interview.  Explore the qualification standards for all occupations and learn about overseas jobs,  healthcare and law enforcement jobs, student employment, and jobs with the Post Office.  Many resources are available to locate job announcements for all occupations including agency sponsored job hot lines, Internet Web site links, employment  services, and directories. Research hiring programs such as student hiring, employee reinstatement, and  veteran’s preference.

This is an interactive blog, submit your questions and comments and we will use the feedback  to develop future articles that will address your interests and concerns. I look forward to working with site visitors to ensure they have the tools and information they need to pursue their federal job quest.